Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson says ‘happy birthday’ to The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT

Did you know that it is our 75th anniversary?

Learn more about The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT by visiting our website. Click here!

Do you have a story to share? Were you involved with The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT during its 75-year history? Let us know by filling out the form below!

Renown Alberta medical researcher says ‘happy anniversary’ to the Lung Association

Yes, it’s true.

The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT (“TLA”) is celebrating it’s 75th anniversary this year.

During the 1930s, tuberculosis (“TB”) was at epidemic levels across Canada. Community leaders in Kinsmen clubs (now KinCanada) across Alberta undertook the work of raising funds to help patients and their families stricken by this debilitating lung disease.

The work accomplished by these dedicated service club members  – who raised money by selling Christmas Seals despite the Great Depression – was the ground work for what The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT is today.

Do you have a story to share? Were you involved with TLA during its 75-year history? Let us know by filling out the form below!

Lung health supporters share what they would do if they could breathe better

PoweredByBreathing poster

The conversation has begun.

We have asked you, our readers of this blog and supporters of lung health, what you would do if you could breathe better.

Through our social media channels, including Twitter and Facebook, we have already received a few responses:

Here are a few messages from Facebook:

Responses to Powered By Breathing

Tell us what you would do by filling out the comment sheet below or by emailing carol@ab.lung.ca.

You should also talk to your doctor about a simple breathing test. To find out more, call our help line at 1-866-717-2673.

Another amazing find in our historical archives: The Creed of the Tuberculosis Worker

Check out what we — at The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT — found in some historical archives at the Provincial Archives of Alberta.

This was written in the early 1950s and was sent out as a memo to all graduating tuberculosis workers and doctors. This is an amazing discovery in our archives and it speaks about how passionate those health professionals were in fighting tuberculosis.

Creed Of The Tuberculosis Worker

By Robert J. Anderson, M.D.

“I believe that what I have done – and others before me – has reduced the suffering and the deaths of my brothers from tuberculosis. I am grateful that biological forces of nature and improving environmental factors created by man have favoured my work.

“I believe that success of our past effort has been furthered by the enlightened interest of
my neighbour, my country-folk, which has led to cooperation and support which exceeds self-interest.

“I believe that my services have not yet reached every outstretched seeking hand. There is yet more for me to do.

TBPatients“I pledge myself to my brother man to search out the many unknown causes of tuberculosis.

“I pledge that I shall treat each person equally in his misfortune, excusing myself not at all for my ignorance of his condition – of which he knows not himself.

“I shall help him and his to hold family and station.

“I shall help to restore him to pleasures of health, family, and work.

“This I shall do within my ability until tuberculosis is no longer found. I shall seek knowledge of things I do now or can do tomorrow.

“I shall hold to these tenets and oaths as long as they save suffering for the sick and protect others.

“These things I shall do, and shall help others who hold likewise.

Do you have a story to share? Were you involved with The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT in the 1960s? Let us know by filling out the form below!

A message from Ivan Todosijczuk


Here is a message from Edmonton resident Ivan Todsijczuk, who is the son of a well-known Alberta tuberculosis doctor.

Todsijczuk’s father, Dr. Demitrius Todsijczuk helped in Alberta’s fight against the debilitating illness in the 1970s and 1980s.

Stay tuned for a feature video about Todsijczuk’s father right here at this very blog!

Share your stories with us here at PoweredByBreathing.com by filling out the form below this post!

Remembering Marion Carson

Marion Carson in 1950 upon receiving a Lifetime Membership Award from the Canadian Tuberculosis Association. A notation on the back of the photo reads “One of Canada’s oldest TB workers, Mrs. WM Carson died in 1950 at the age of 89, after a lifetime devoted to the service of humanity. She was a pioneer voluntary fighter against TB in Alberta and was an honourary life member of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association.” PHOTO SUPPLIED BY THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA

Marion Carson in 1950 upon receiving a Lifetime Membership Award from the Canadian Tuberculosis Association. A notation on the back of the photo reads “One of Canada’s oldest TB workers, Mrs. WM Carson died in 1950 at the age of 89, after a lifetime devoted to the service of humanity. She was a pioneer voluntary fighter against TB in Alberta and was an honourary life member of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association.” PHOTO SUPPLIED BY THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA

Alberta’s tuberculosis movement began with a woman of vision.

Calgary’s Marion Carson devoted her life to help tuberculosis patients in Alberta – working actively up until her death at age 89 in 1950.

Marion begins our story as The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT (“TLA”) looks back and celebrates our 75 years of service to the community.

Marion was born in Kent County, Ont. May 9, 1861, but moved westward to Manitoba and eventually settled in Calgary with her husband William Carson in 1893.

She was tremendously active in her newly adopted home, creating the Women’s Literacy Club in 1906, and as an active member of the Calgary School Board during the 1920s. She also helped underprivileged children by collecting milk money for Calgary’s less fortunate and formed a group to feed the unemployed during the Great Depression.

According to archives from the Calgary School Board, Marion realized her passion and true calling was in helping the shockingly high number of patients who were suffering from tuberculosis.

Stricken by the unusually high number of cases, Marion began actively volunteering and recruiting others in her work. Her efforts eventually led to the construction of Alberta’s first TB sanatorium in 1910, and for years after that, Marion led free TB clinics for school children.

Marion became the first leader of the newly formed “Alberta Tuberculosis Association” (now TLA) and held the role for more than a decade.

Known as one of Canada’s oldest tuberculosis workers, Mrs. Carson was awarded with a lifetime membership to the Canadian Tuberculosis Association (now the Canadian Lung Association) in 1950 shortly before she died.

Her legacy is a reason why the school board in Calgary chose to name Marion Carson School after the legendary woman of vision.

 

“Carson is an excellent example of somebody who gave her whole life towards making a difference for others,” said Joy Bowen-Eyre, vice-chair of the Calgary Board of Education.

Click here for more information on how to become a volunteer with TLA or phone 1-888-566-5864.

Have a story about The Lung Association, Alberta & NWT that you would like to share? Let us know about it by commenting below!

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